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I first got involved with CIRA back in 2005 when I ran for election to its Board of Directors. The organization needed to add business leadership and diversity of thought and with my financial, operational and entrepreneurial high-tech background, I felt I had something to offer.

In those 'early' days, the Board was dealing with many important issues, from evolving the governance policies and processes to setting the strategic direction to changing leadership for growth. It really was a pivotal time in the development of the organization. So when in 2006, I had the opportunity to take on a leadership role with CIRA as Chair, I was pleased to do so.

Once my term was over in 2008, I took a break from CIRA's governance for a couple of years feeling confident that I had made a difference for Canada's Internet community. In 2010 I decided to get involved again. The organization was in a very different place in its evolution and I knew I wanted to be a part of it. I watched it grow from a start up to a national and international thought leader.

From their dialogue with Canadians at the Canadian Internet Forum to the recently launched Community Investment Program and its work in establishing Internet Exchange Points, CIRA is doing some of the most innovative and important work to advance the Internet in Canada. It is a source of pride for Canadians.

Since I don't have the time to commit to CIRA's Board of Directors (I already have seats on a couple of boards of national Canadian organizations) I chose to join its Nomination Committee, or NomCom as we call it. The NomCom is an interesting and important entity. CIRA has come under fire in the past for having a complex governance structure. It has a two-tiered election process with separate slates of candidates all voted on by a member base. However, this complexity serves to ensure the best possible representation on the Board as possible.

An organization like CIRA is unique. Its work is high-tech, but it is also deeply involved in the Internet policy world. It is also one of the rare organizations whose work touches the lives of almost every Canadian, either directly or indirectly. Ensuring the interests of those stakeholders are represented is no easy task.

Making sure they are represented while also ensuring the organization has the skills and knowledge it needs to develop and grow is even tougher. That's the role of the NomCom. It is the entity that helps to build a Board of Directors that represents a wide range of views and interests. By playing this critical role, the NomCom contributes to the strategic direction of .CA and Canadian Internet policy.

As a member of the NomCom, we solicit and select qualified Candidates for the Nomination Committee Slate of CIRA's Board of Directors Election. I'm now in my second term on the NomCom and have been the Chair of the committee since 2013.

I'm proud to say that I've been associated with CIRA for almost a decade now. It's an experience I would recommend to anyone who has the skills and the desire to make a difference for Canada's Internet community. The opportunity to have some unique and amazing experiences is second to none, and you get to work with a diverse group of committed professionals from across the country.

In the coming months, CIRA will be issuing calls for both Board members and NomCom members. Please take the time to consider them. If you decide to put your name forward, great. If not, think about your friends and colleagues - would they, and the Canadian Internet community at large, benefit? Then please approach them. Together, we can build a better Internet for all Canadians.

Guest post by Deborah Rosati